Sointu Tee Tutorial

Named Clothing is a company that produces sewing patterns, offers fabric sales, instructions and SEW much more! I perused their website and was very impressed with their offerings. I chose to give the Sointu Tee pattern a go. The Sointu Tee is a great pattern for either woven or stretch fabrics. How cool is that! It has hints of Asian flair with the “batwing-style” sleeves and tie around the waist. I downloaded the PDF, printed all the pages and got into my ZEN moment taping them all together. Now I want to give a “shout out” to my kindergarten teacher for teaching me perilous lessons with paper, scissors and tape.

Sew Here We GO! I purchased a couple yards of lyocell linen, laid out the pattern pieces and went to work cutting them out. I had quite a bit of left over fabric so I made a design change decision, and cut out a front and back neck facing instead of using bias binding for the neckline. I just thought with a woven non-stretch fabric it would look a little classier???? (is that a word?). I just laid out the front and back piece, copied the neck edges and just aded about 3 or so extra inches. Here is what came out:

I’m not a big fan of interfacing when it’s not needed. It sometimes adds too much bulk and stiffness where you don’t want/need the extra strength it gives. My linen didn’t need any more structure than it already had around the neck BUT I did want to reenforce the shoulder seams. I grabbed my handy dandy fusible bias tape and ironed that onto the seam line of the shoulders. I also did a stay stitch around the neckline just to keep everything in place. Sew the shoulder seams and finish them with a zigzag or an overlock stitch.

Time to sew the facings together, press the seams, and get it ready to attach it to the neckline of the shirt. I completed an overlock stitch around the edges of the facing to keep them from fraying when washed and worn.

Before I sewed the side seams, I attached the neckline facing to the shirt. I’m a believer in doing an under-stitch to encourage that facing to lay flat against the skin. I added a couple of tacks to hold it in place along the should seams too.

OK, one other thing before you sew the side seams… Make your belt loops and tack them on the right side of the front panel where the notches are. NOW go ahead now and sew those side seams!

After that, grab those sleeve cuff bands, sew them together at the short end. Fold them in half with right side out and give them a nice press. I went ahead and basted them at the raw edge just to hold them together better for when I attached them to the sleeve. I noticed when I went to pin the band to the sleeve that the band was a bit smaller than the sleeve so I made a command decision and just took a generous seam allowance under the arm to make them fit. It actually worked out great! Sew the cuff to the shirt and give those a good press AFTER you finish the seam allowance off with a zigzag or overlock stitch. (yeah yeah yeah… you know the drill by now… always finish your seams).

Now hem your shirt however you want it hemmed. I used a blind hem stitch with my sewing machine. Final step. Sew your belt together, turn it right side out and give it a good press. I made another command decision here too. No interfacing in my belt and I did a pointed angle on the ends instead on a straight box finish.

All’s well that ends well… It came out really nice. It’s super comfortable and cute as can be. I have noticed that I’m going to have to perhaps sew a smaller size on my garments in the future since I’ve been loosing a bit of weight, but it’s still very wearable. LOVE IT!

2 thoughts on “Sointu Tee Tutorial

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s